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Ethics in Emergency Medicine, 2nd ed.
Eds: Kenneth V. Iserson, M.D., Arthur B. Sanders, 
M.D., Deborah Mathieu, Ph.D.

Extras:
Sample Advance Directives
A Rapid Approach to Ethical Problems
CASE: PRACTICING PROCEDURES ON THE NEWLY DEAD
CASE: RIGHTS OF MINORS
ORGAN AND WHOLE-BODY DONATION CARDS
A Sample Protocol to Use When Speaking With Survivors
Expected versus Sudden, Unexpected Deaths (Table 1-1)
The History of Biological Warfare

With a legal introduction by: Alexander M. Capron, L.L.B.

  • How do you decide whether a patient is "competent"?
  • What do you do if your patient refuses necessary care?
  • How far does the obligation of confidentiality extend in emergency settings?
  • Do you need informed consent in emergency medical research?
  • What are the obligations of the Good Samaritan statutes?

Prepare in advance for ethical dilemmas in Emergency Medical, Nursing, and Prehospital practice. Case-based discussions, focused on a specific area of ethical decision making, provide a straightforward approach to a wide range of ethical issues. Among the areas addressed are: autonomy, threatening situations, education and confidentiality, and professional relationships. Learn to identify, refine, and apply general moral principals to your practice. This book helps you make decisions when seconds count! 

589 PP. ISBN 1-883620-14-7
Softcover,
Catalog # 007 $39.95

order now button

Ethics in Emergency Medicine
Helps prepare you to face ethical dilemmas
in your emergency medical practice.

Do You Know . . .
· Which of the decisions you make involve ethical decisions?
· When must you break patient confidentiality?
· How do you decide whether your patient has the capacity to make a healthcare decision?
· Which awake patients may not make their own health care decisions? Who makes the decisions then?
· When and how should you use advance directives (Living Wills, Durable Powers of Attorney for Healthcare)?
· What should you do when your patient refuses necessary care?
· When may you treat minors?
· How do professional etiquette differ from ethics?
· What unique ethical dilemmas to EMS providers face?
· Must you obtain informed consent emergency medical research?
· What confidentiality problems arise when dealing with relatives, the police, EMS communications, telephone discussions, and the media?
· What are prehospital advance directives? How do you use them?
· How do the ethical principles of autonomy and informed consent affect emergency practitioners?
· When does self-preservation outweigh doing good for patients in the ED and the EMS?
· How you should ethically practice, teach, and do research? What do the Hippocratic Oath, American College of Emergency Physicians, and other emergency medicine and international groups say about it?

Ethics in Emergency Medicine answers these questions and more.

Reviews of Ethics In Emergency Medicine, Second Edition.

Thorough, informative, and extremely well referenced.
The editors have assembled some of the top ethicists in the field for this compelling work. An eclectic mixture of perspectives makes the case-reviews particularly appealing. The cases chosen cover a wide breadth of topics leaving virtually no question unanswered. The early chapters arm the reader with interesting background and provide a workable approach to solving ethical dilemmas in Emergency Medicine in general; the cases expand upon this formulation and put flesh onto the principles and guidelines. Required reading for all practitioners of the art and science of emergency medicine. An important contribution to the field by the pioneers of emergency medical ethics!
Greg L. Larkin MD MS MSPH FACEP, Chair, Ethics Committee American College of Emergency Medicine

Midwest Book Review
Now in a significantly updated second edition, Ethics In Emergency Medicine covers all of the major controversies in the field of Bioethics. Ethics In Emergency Medicine has been revised and expanded to include twice as many cases covering the topics of: Autonomy & Consent, Education & Research, and Privacy & Confidentiality. The list of contributors includes the most prestigious names in the field of Bioethics. Ethics In Emergency Medicine is useful as a textbook and as a reference book for emergency physicians, emergency nurses, paramedics, hospital and clinic board members, attorneys practicing tort law in the field of medicine, legislators dealing with medical law, academics and students in the field of ethics, and any interested general reader concerned with the subject of bioethics. This book is essential reading to bring into focus today's medical treatment and funding issues.

From Book News, Inc.
The second edition of a casebook first published in 1986, for doctors, nurses, paramedics, lawyers, social workers, philosophers, and hospital administrators who have to make ethical decisions quickly. Cases encompass autonomy and informed consent, education and research, privacy and confidentiality, life-sustaining treatment, professional relations, allocation of health care resources, quality of care, and threatening situations.

Table of Contents

Section 1: Introduction: 1. General Introduction; 2. Unique Aspects of Ethics in Emergency Medicine; 3. Legal Setting of Emergency Medicine; 4. What is Ethics? 5. An Approach to Ethical Problems in Emergency Medicine.
Section 2: Cases & Commentaries
6. Autonomy and Informed Consent
Informed Participation in Decisions (6-1); The Question of Competence (6-2, 6-3, 6-4); Suicide (6-5, 6-6); Rights of Minors (6-7, 6-8); Uncertain Diagnosis and the Uncooperative Patient (6-9); A Slight Postmortem Disagreement (6-10); Impaired Decision Making (6-11, 6-12); Consent: Explicit and Presumed (6-13).
7. Education and Research
Research and Student Exploitation (7-1 ); Faculty-Student Relationships (7-2); Paramedic Education (7-3); Practicing Procedures on the Newly Dead (7-4); Human Subjects in Resuscitation Research (7-5); Human Subjects in Trauma Research (7-6); Prehospital Research and Informed Consent (7-7); Phase 4 Research Projects (7-8); 8. Privacy and Confidentiality ' legal Requirements for Notification (8-1); Answering Questions from "Relatives" (8-2 to 8-5); Security of the Emergency Medical Service System Radio Network (8-6); Police Information (8-7, 8-8); Request for Special Treatment (8-9); Potential Harm to a Third Party (8-10); Calling other Emergency Departments about Suspicious Patients (8-11).
9. Life-Sustaining Treatment-Emergency Department.
Resuscitating a Patient with No Vital Signs (9-1); When Not to Resuscitate (9-2, 9-3); Pediatric Patients-Do We Try too Hard? (9-4); Community Standards for Resuscitation-are they Valid? (9-5); Organ Donation-the Uncertain Donor (9-6); Organ Donation-the Willing Donor (9-7); A Questionable Parental Request (9-8).
10. Life-Sustaining Treatment-Prehospital
Prehospital Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders (10-1,10-2); Medical Futility (10-3); Disagreement on "Optimal" Treatment (10-4); Unauthorized Lifesaving Procedures (10-5).
11. Professional Relations
Nurse-Physician Relationships (11-1); Conscientious Objections (Bad Orders); (11-2); Telephone Orders from local Physicians (11-3); Delegating Notification of Death to Others (11-4); Consultation Dilemmas (11-5, 11-6); Referral Back to an Incompetent Primary Care Provider (11-7); Referral to Specialists at Another Hospital (11-8); The Questionably Impaired Health Care Professional (11-9, 11-10); Relationship to Biomedical Companies (11-11, .11-12); Relationship with Hospital and Community (11-13).
12. Allocation of Health Care Resources
The Manipulative Patient; the Irresponsible Family; and the Nursing Home "Dump" (12-1 to 12-3); Allocation of Resources: Social and Political Factors (12-4); Allocation of Resources: Economic Factors (12-5); Fee-for-Service System of Care (12-6); Increased Charges for Third-Party-Payer Patients (12-7); No Payment-Adult or Child (12-8); "Gatekeeper's" Role (12-9, 12-10); Patient Transfers (12-11); Patient-Requested laboratory Tests (12-12,12-13).
13. Quality of Care
Continuous Quality Improvement and Peer Review (13-1); Responsibility to Monitor and Remedy Quality-of-Care Mistakes (13-2); Physicians' Attitudes Toward Patients (13-3); Physician's Quality of life vs. Patient Care (13-4); Solo Nurse in the Emergency Department (13-5); Treating Cases Beyond Your Abilities (13-6); Telephone Consultations with Health Care Providers or Others (13-7); Physician Calls re: Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders (13-8); Denial of Antipregnancy Prophylaxis to a Rape Victim (13-9).
14. Threatening .Situations
Resuscitation of an AIDS Patient (14-1); Failure-to-Stop laws and Good Samaritan Behavior (14-2); A Desperate Flight (14-3); Patient Confidentiality vs. the Rights of ED Personnel (14-4); ED Personnel's Safety vs. a Duty to Treat (14-5); Prehospital Personnel's Safety vs. a Duty to Treat; (14-6); Use of Patient Restraints (14-7); Wilderness Medicine (14-8).
Section 3: Ethical Statements Pertaining to Medical Care
· Hippocratic Oath; Oath of Louis Lasagna; Emergency Medical Technician's Oath;
· Prayer of Maimonides; Flight Nurse's Creed; Declaration of Geneva;
· American Medical Association's Principles of Medical Ethics. American Osteopathic Association's Code of Ethics; Canadian Medical Association's Code of Ethics; Australian Medical Association's Code of Ethics;
· American Nurses Association's Code for Nurses; Emergency Medical Technician's Code of Ethics;
· Emergency Nurses Association's Code of Ethics;
· Emergency Medicine Residents' Association's Principles of Medical Ethics;
· International Council of Nurses' Code for Nurses;
· World Medical Association's International Code of Medical Elhics;
· American Hospital Association's Patient's Bill of Rights; Nuremberg Code; Declaration of Helsinki;
· American Medical Association's Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Investigation;
· Regulations of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on the Protection of Human Subjects.

Appendix.
· Prehospital Advance Directives.
· Arizona living Wills and Health Care Directives Act.
· Montana's Comfort One Protocol.
Glossary

Bibliography

Index
FIGURES & TABLES
Figures
Figure 1: Method for Ethical Decision Making.
Figure 2: A Rapid Approach to Ethical Problems.
Figure 3: Wilderness Medicine's Ethical Triangle.
Tables
Table 1: Differences between Emergency and Primary Care Practice.
Table 2: Elements of Consent.
Table 3: Elements of Decision-Making Capacity.
Table 4: Exceptions to the Infrmed Consent Rule.
Table 5: Factors Distinguishing the Cases.
Table 6: Consent for Minors.
Table 7: Reasons to Withhold Life-Preserving Treatments.
Table 8: Possible Relevant Differences between Mr. Brook & Mrs. Lowell.
Table 9: Questions Affecting Treatment Decisions.
Table 10: Basis of Physician's Responsibility to Notify Family of Death.
Table 11: Competing Views of Emergency Physicians' Obligations.
Table 12: Grounds to Determine a Patient's "Best Interest."
Table 13: Arguments for Treating a Patient in his Best Interest and Contrary to his Demand for a Riskier Alternative.
Table 14: Advantages and Limitations of Quality Assurance Measurements.
Table 15: Physicians' Attitudes toward Patients.
Tabte 16: Methods of Escaping from Responsible Moral Decision Making. "
Table 17: Are We Morally Obligated to Risk our Lives for Others?
Table 18: Sources of Risk to Rescuers.
Table 19: Fundamental Humanitarian Concerns.
Table 20: Economic Guidelines & Medical Etiquette in Medical Codes.

Extras:
Sample Advance Directives
A Rapid Approach to Ethical Problems
CASE: PRACTICING PROCEDURES ON THE NEWLY DEAD
CASE: RIGHTS OF MINORS
ORGAN AND WHOLE-BODY DONATION CARDS
A Sample Protocol to Use When Speaking With Survivors
Expected versus Sudden, Unexpected Deaths (Table 1-1)
The History of Biological Warfare

 

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